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Shipping Wonders of the World (1936-7)



The final issue of Railway Wonders of the World promoted the next title, Shipping Wonders of the World. The first issue of which appeared on Friday 31st January 1936, exactly three weeks after issue 50 of Railway Wonders appeared.


It was advertised as “the romance of the seven seas in story and picture. … It is the saga of the sea, illustrating the inspiration, courage, heroism and enterprise which have been through the age. The story of the Seven Seas is one of enthralling interest to laymen, students and experts alike. It is, perhaps, the biggest story that can ever be written.”

Other Part Works Edited by Clarence Winchester

shipping wonders of the world part 1shipping wonders of the world part 15


Shipping Wonders of the World followed a similar format to its predecessor. Originally planned to cover “about 40 parts”, it was completed in 55 parts, the final issue appearing on 23rd February 1937. The first issue included a special engraving of the RMS Queen Mary, whilst a two-page colour plate appeared with the second issue.


The Consulting Editors were A. C. Hardy and Frank C. Bowen, both of whom regularly contributed articles which were identifiable as theirs.


Throughout the series other expert writers were also commissioned to cover more specialised topics. Many of the artists were also identified, for instance, the cover of the first issue (shown above) was by Mr K. M. Sibley, who appears to have been the “house” artist.


The undoubted success of Railway Wonders of the World led to further series being planned. They were also published by The Amalgamated Press under the Editorship of Clarence Winchester. Here is a brief summary of the other series.


Wonders of World Engineering (1937-8)


The final issue of Shipping Wonders of the World promoted the next title, Wonders of World Engineering. The first part appeared on Friday 2nd March 1937, exactly a week after issue 55 of Shipping Wonders of the World.


It was advertised as “a comprehensive survey and explanation of the wonderful achievements of the engineer in his conquests over Nature. There is much that is genuinely romantic in the world of Engineering, in which inventive men, supported by the courage of pioneers, grapple with problems that seem insuperable. The great bridge, the railway, the aeroplane, the steelworks, the wonderful dam, the great wireless station - all are milestones on the highway of human achievement.”

wonders of world engineering part 1


Wonders of World Engineering followed a similar format to its predecessors. It was completed in 53 parts, the final issue appearing on 1st March 1938. The first issue included a special fold-out cutaway drawing of an “Empire” flying boat, whilst part two included a special fold-out drawing of the Mersey Tunnel.


The Consulting Editor was Thomas Walley, and amongst the specialist contributors were Cecil J. Allen and C. Hamilton Ellis. The series covered a number of railway-related topics, as shown by the cover of part 31 (shown left). This issue included an article on “Britain’s Streamlined Expresses” by Cecil J. Allen.


Similar binding arrangements to Railway Wonders were available for Shipping Wonders and Wonders of World Engineering, the binding cases being blue and dark green respectively.

Wonders of world engineering part 31


Wonders of World Aviation (1938)


The final issue of Wonders of World Engineering. promoted the next title, Wonders of World Aviation. The first part appeared on Friday 8th March 1938, exactly a week after issue 53 of Wonders of World Engineering.


Wonders of World Aviation - “the conquest of the air in story and picture” - proved to be the final series, and the one that was probably closest to Clarence Winchester's own interests. It first appeared in March 1938 and consisted of only 40 issues, the series completing by the end of the year. Undoubtedly by the time this series was nearing completion, the approach of war meant that any further plans to produce anything new were placed on hold.

wonders of world aviation part 1